Repairing Bleach Spots

My husband and I have been losing weight. I went down a dress size and he is down to the size he was after basic training over 30 years ago!

YES, I’M IRRITATED!!!!

But this post is not about the unfairness of the difference of weight loss between the sexes. (I also promise not to rant on Prednisone’s ability to pack on the pounds.)

I am in between my regular size and my “Prednisone” size. (Thank God, I have only had to use it once this year!)

I refuse to spend an arm and a leg buying a wardrobe to fit my interim size. I will only need summer clothes for a few more weeks and I plan on being back to my regular size at the beginning of next summer.

I headed to Goodwill.

I found a pair of new-looking Capri shorts, in the correct size and color, but was disappointed when I saw some tiny spots. It looked like chemical over spray on them that had bleached out the black dye.

Repaired bleach spots.

Repair bleached spots.

I have a solution…a permanent marker!

I dabbed the spots with permanent marker. The marker “dyed” the bleach spots and the Capri shorts are like new again!

Repaired Bleach Spots

Repaired Bleach Spots

The best part? When I washed them, my husband thought they were my sons and put them with his clothes. Yeah…he wears a 30-32!

 

 

 

A Little Reinforcement Here

I love my waterbed.

I know you are flashing back to the 70’s, but that bed got me through several months of bed-rest when I was carrying my last two children. At one point, the nurse asked me how I managed to avoid bed sores and I shared that a waterbed does not give you any pressure points.

During my single days, I was referred to as “The Waterbed Girl,” because there was only one waterbed store in town and I moved to town to work there. (My husband sure enjoyed my nickname. He’d announce, “Yeah, I’m dating “The Waterbed Girl.”)

There is one downside to a waterbed and that is finding waterbed sheets that will stay on. I shared my frustrations in a posts, see http://wp.me/pKNzn-qu.

Waterbed sheets consist of a top sheet that is sewn to the base of a bottom sheet. It is only sewn together in the center third of the sheet for those who like to stick their feet out from under the sheet.

Unfortunately, over time, the top sheet can tear away from the bottom sheet and then it will unravel. I have used the zigzag stitch to sew the sheets back together a few times.

This time I added seam binding to the seam and used the zigzag stitch over all of the seam binding.

I added seam binding to the base of my waterbed sheets.

I added seam binding to the base of my waterbed sheets.

Best Metal Investment

I don’t have bars of gold sewn into my mattress.

My plumbing is not made of copper.

My wedding ring is not platinum.

I did not inherit my grandmothers antique silver set.

My silverware is stainless steel, not silver.

There is no coin collection that is gaining value as we speak.

My best metal investment is one that is protecting my other investments.

It is my upholstery needle kit.

My package of assorted needles by Homecraft contains 7 needles:

  1. Carpet Sharp: Large and heavier sharp for stitching carpets and rugs.
  2. Glover: Tapered point needle with sharp edges used to sew leather and leather-like fabrics.
  3. Chenille: Sharp point needle with large eyes for crewel, candlewicking, embroidery.
  4. Tapestry: Blunt point needle used for plastic canvas, needlepoint or sewing heavy yarns.
  5. Tufting: needle for tufting repairs on upholstery, heavy materials.
  6. Small Curved: Needle used for sewing upholstery, mattresses.
  7. Large Curved: Needle used for upholstery and lampshades.

(The curved upholstery needles get the most use, but I have used all of them.)

With that kit I…

  1. Repaired the seams on torn cushions.
  2. Pulled the over-stuffed cushions on the arms and the backs of my couch back up to their original location and used the needle to attach them firmly.
  3. Used the large, curved needle to do major surgery on my couch. The front piece under the cushions was torn and the actual board was displaced. I cut the fabric the length of the board. I put the board back in place and put the vinyl piece back on top of it. I used a staple gun to attach it. I pulled all of the batting back in place and using a strong thread I sewed the cut back together. Then I spent fifteen minutes a day sewing over the seam with a satin stitch. It took several months, but when I finished I had a new-looking couch. (The seam is covered by the cushions.)
  4. Sewed up the loose seams on the upholstered chairs at church.
  5. Repaired shoes, belts, and purses.
  6. Repaired the torn upholstery, and ceiling fabric, in our van.
  7. Repaired luggage and sports bags.
  8. Repaired a baseball glove and other sports equipment.
  9. Repaired a cell phone case, see http://wp.me/pKNzn-hF.
  10. Sewed allergy screening to the base of my large, window screens, see http://wp.me/pKNzn-qc.

Yes, that was the best metal investment I have made!

Needles found in a upholstery needle kit,

Needles found in a upholstery needle kit.

On the Fringes

Last weekend we went shopping for work jeans for my husband. It is like a treasure hunt because he is 6′ 2″ and over 200 pounds. The regular sizes are too small and the “Big & Tall” are too big!

We struck out.

But he started his new job on Tuesday and he had to have something to wear to work. I checked 2 pair of his work jeans and there were no holes; they just were frayed at the leg openings.

I cut the white “fringes” off and they looked presentable. They will have to do until he can find a pair somewhere.

The pair on the left still has the "fringe" on the leg openings. The pair on the right had the white "fringe" removed.

The pair on the left still has the “fringe” on the leg openings. The pair on the right had the white “fringe” removed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter – @frugalfishorg

Facebook – Frugal Fish

 

 

 

 

 

Keep Temporary Fixes Temporary

Mom stopped by and noticed the hooks holding up my invisible chair were loose, see http://wp.me/pKNzn-tj. She told me to break the end off of a match and put the broken matchstick in the hole.

When I screwed the hook back in, the matchstick made the hole smaller and gave the hook something to grip.

She said “You can fix a lot of things with match sticks and duct tape!”

Using her ingenuity, I repaired Derek’s work shoes with electrician’s tape. (The tape is black and was not as obvious as duct tape would have been.)

More importantly, I ordered a replacement pair the same day.

It is easy to forget something needs replaced when the temporary fix works just fine. But the temporary fix will fail at some point and it will not be a convenient time!

Temporary fixes are not permanent.

That reminds me…I need to put a new anchor in that hook holding up the invisible chair!

Black electrician's tape temporarily fixed work shoes until the new ones came in.

Black electrician’s tape temporarily fixed work shoes until the new ones came in.

 

Refinished Drums

My son turns 22 in 2 days. I am pleased to note that he has inherited a few frugal tendencies!

He bought himself a drums set a few years ago since he was a music major and attending college on a drum scholarship. At the time he played for a few bands, and one band played at the local county fair.

It was so hot you could fry eggs on the sidewalk. His drum set was up on a trailer in the full sun and the hard black plastic started to melt! When he noticed it, he covered the entire set with a blanket until it was their turn to play.

When he told me about it, I expected him to ask me to buy him a new drum. I was relieved that he did not do that!

Last spring, he decided to fix it himself. He got together with his best friend, Jordan, and using a hair dryer, they melted the glue backing and peeled the black plastic off. It came off in one piece!

They removed the black from three of the drums and left the snare black. He’s gotten many compliments on his “Retro” set of drums.

My son’s drums, before and after.

 

Just to the End of Summer

Labor Day has passed and to many that means fall has begun. Yet, here in Iowa it is still in the upper 80’s! We will be wearing our summer wardrobes for a few weeks more.

I found the bottom edge of a pair of David’s shorts was worn out. I didn’t want to replace them this late in the year and finding his size was difficult. (I married a big man!)

I folded the edge up about one-fourth of an inch and pinned them. I did not rip out the hem.

David's worn shorts, folded and pinned.

David’s worn shorts, folded and pinned.

 

I then stitched below the original stitching one-fourth of an inch. (I planned on adding another line of stitching, but I ran out of gray thread!)

Stitching below the original line of stitching.

Stitching below the original line of stitching.

 

 

I ended up with a “new” edge on a pair of shorts that was only one-fourth of an inch shorter. I did not intend for these to last another year…just to the end of the season.

 

Match the Duct Tape

Last week I showed you the ottoman I recovered. The photo I posted did not show the damage…or the gray Duct tape.

After I made the cover, I found some Duct Tape in my basement that matched it. I taped it over the gray tape.

View of the base of my ottoman.

View of the base of my ottoman.

Now if the skirt on my ottoman cover ruffles in the breeze there will not be any gray revealed.

When I am using the chair the ottoman slides right out.

When I am using the chair the ottoman slides right out.

 

From Bed-Skirt to Ottoman Cover

I shared on Tuesday how I reinforced a bed-skirt of my mothers. She didn’t want the material I cut off and I decided to use it to make an ottoman cover.

The material I cut off of the bed-skirt and the ottoman I wanted to cover.

The material I cut off of the bed-skirt and the ottoman I wanted to cover.

The first thing I did was to pin the bed-skirt material directly into the seam of the ottoman. I formed corners the same size as the original corners on the bed-skirt. This way I did not have to hem the cover.

Pinned bed-skirt around base of ottoman.

Pinned bed-skirt around base of ottoman.

I basted the seam at the top and basted all of the corner pleats shut.

Side of the ottoman cover with the pleats basted shut and basting where the seam would go.

Side of the ottoman cover after basting.

I lay a piece of fabric over the top of the ottoman and cut it a few inches larger. I used a scrap piece of quilt batting to strengthen the top fabric.

Pinned quilt batting to the top piece of fabric.

Pinned quilt batting to the top piece of fabric.

I took the side piece off and placed it back on the ottoman inside out. Then I pinned the upside-down top piece to the basted seam on the side piece.

Pinned the top to the side pieces.

Pinned the top to the side pieces.

Moving the ottoman up on a table to make it easier to handle, I basted the pinned seam on the top piece to the basted seam on the side piece.

I basted the top piece at the pins to the basted seam on the side piece.

I basted the top piece at the pins to the basted seam on the side piece.

I turned it right-side out to check the fit on the ottoman.

I turned it right-side out to check the fit on the ottoman.

Sewed along the basting.

Sewed along the basting.

I trimmed the excess material off.

I trimmed the excess material off.

I used a zig-zag stitch on the edge of the seam to prevent fraying.

I used a zig-zag stitch on the edge of the seam to prevent fraying.

I sewed the pleat shut where the material came together.

I sewed the pleat shut where the material came together.

I removed the basting on the pleats.

I removed the basting on the pleats.

I pinned the seam to face under the top piece and top-stitched it down.

I pinned the seam to face under the top piece and top-stitched it down.

I washed it to make sure it didn't shrink and then sewed the top seam to the seam of the actual ottoman with my curved upholstery needle.

I washed it to make sure it didn’t shrink and then sewed the top seam to the seam of the actual ottoman with my curved upholstery needle.

I kept this ottoman because it fits under this chair when I don't want to use it.

I kept this ottoman because it fits under this chair when I don’t want to use it.

When I am using the chair the ottoman slide right out.

When I am using the chair the ottoman slides right out.

I made this over the course of two days. I had fun because I was watching John Wayne movies while I worked on it!

 

 

 

Mother’s Bed-Skirt Challenge

My mother gave me a sewing challenge this last fall. She had a bed-skirt that matched her fall/winter bedspread, but the center of it was made out of a paper-like material. One corner had ripped a bit.

My mother's bed-skirt with a torn corner.

My mother’s bed-skirt with a torn corner.

She found an old-fashioned mattress cover that was made out of a heavy, thick flannel. People used to put them under the sheets to protect the mattress. She wanted me to sew the mattress cover to the bed-skirt.
I didn’t rip the old one apart. I just pinned the mattress cover to the bed-skirt. It was several inches longer, but I folded the end over and sewed it down.

I folded the extra material over and sewed it down.

I folded the extra material over and sewed it down.

It was the correct width and worked nicely. I used the zigzag stitch in the torn corner to sew the paper to the cover.

I sewed the torn pieces down.

I sewed the torn pieces down.

She had another bed-skirt that matched her spring/summer bedspread. She couldn’t find another mattress cover, but saw a bed-skirt that was the same size with heavy center material. I cut that skirt off and sewed the center material to her spring/summer bed-skirt.
I liked the neutral color of the bed-skirt material, and since she didn’t want it, I stuck it in my closet. Wait until you see what I did with that material!
You have to come back this Thursday!